X-ray SAG

The goal of the X-ray Science Analysis Group (XRSAG) is to provide quantitative metrics and assessments to NASA in regard to future X-ray observatories. Specifically, the XRSAG will

  • Track and analyze evolving science goals and requirements in X-ray astronomy, especially as current "hot" topics evolve.
  • Provide an active communication forum for X-ray astrophysics (e.g., via town hall meetings at venues such as AAS and APS meetings).
  • Support mission studies and concept development for future X-ray observatories.
  • Analyze technology development and prioritization plans with respect to redefined science goals and the evolution of mission concepts (i.e., the XRSAG will aid the PhysPAG in analyzing technology needs).

The XRSAG is open to all members of the community.

If you are interested in contributing to the work of the XRSAG, please subscribe using the link below. For other inquiries, e-mail Jay Bookbinder, chair of the XRSAG, at jbookbinder@cfa.harvard.edu

Jay Bookbinder, Chairjbookbinder@cfa.harvard.edu


XRSAG Mailing List

Subscribe to the XRSAG mailing list.

Program News

22 Aug 2016
Call for Nominations to the Executive Committee of the Physics of the Cosmos Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG) »  [PDF]
28 July 2016
L3ST Interim Report now available »  [PDF]
14 July 2016
PCOS Newsletter for July 2016 now available »  [PDF]
14 June 2016
LISA Pathfinder First Results Announcements »  Details

Project News

Chandra News
30 Aug 2016
Record-breaking Galaxy Cluster Discovered » Details
Fermi News
12 Aug 2016
NASA's Fermi Mission Expands its Search for Dark Matter » Details
Planck News
13 Aug 2016
First Stars Formed Even Later Than Previously Thought
» Details
XMM-Newton News
29 Aug 2016
XMM-Newton Reveals the Milky Way's Explosive Past » Details

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Hitomi News
6 July 2016
Hitomi Mission Charts Hot Winds of a Galaxy Cluster for the First Time »  Details
28 Jul 2016
Chorus of Black Holes Sings in X-Rays » Details
Suzaku News
26 Aug 2015
X-ray Astronomy Satellite "Suzaku" Completes Scientific Mission » Details
Swift News
8 Sep 2016
Young Magnetar Likely the Slowest Pulsar Ever Detected » Details